Therapists specialising in Sexual Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse is any forced and unwanted sexual activity. Since children are unable to consent, sexual child abuse is any sexual activity, such as molestation, involving a child. Most of the time, the victims of sexual abuse know their attacker and sexual abuse often becomes worse over time. A person who has been sexually abused (been subject to molestation or rape) may feel anger, shock, shame, guilt, fear or disbelief.

If you have been sexually abused, as a child or an adult, you may develop depression, anxiety, poor self-esteem or post-traumatic stress disorder.  A qualified therapists can help victims of sexual abuse, both children and adults, to recover from the sexual trauma they have experienced.

Sexual Abuse

The abuser may use sexual abuse to maintain power and control over the victim. The majority of victims are women, however men suffer too. Sexual abuse is classed as any forced and unwanted sexual activity. The can involve being subject to molestation, assault and rape. Since children are unable to consent this means any sexual activity involving a child is sexual abuse. Most of the time, the victims of sexual abuse know their attacker and sexual abuse often becomes worse over time. As a result victims of sexual abuse may, above all, feel disbelief as well as anger, shame or fear. Victims of sexual abuse may often suffer with poor self-esteem, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Despite the form it takes, abuse can cause lasting mental and emotional harm. Abusive-relationships can have long-term damaging effects on the victim. Feelings of shame, guilt, anxiety, depression, anger, trust problems, or self-destructive behaviour are common for victims of abuse. Victims and survivors of sexual abuse or molestation can benefit from counselling to cope with the experience and also related trauma. Family members of abuse survivors can also suffer with anxiety, shame and disbelief and as a result benefit from therapy. Consequently this can help them develop their own healthy and supportive ways of coping.

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